Americs's Finest Optical Retailers 2016

Common Vision Problems

We treat a variety of vision problems here at Urban Optics. Here are the four most common ones we see:

Nearsighted (Myopia)

The majority of people wearing glasses are nearsighted. They have difficulty seeing objects far away but have clear vision up close. Nearsightedness can cause squinting and eyestrain when viewing distant objects. Most people develop nearsightedness in childhood and stabilize as young adults. Correction can be in the form of glasses, contact lenses, or both! Dr. Schultz feels most people benefit from both options.

Farsighted (Hyperopia)

Those that are farsighted, normally have great distance vision. Depending on the severity, they are likely to have trouble seeing objects up close. Farsightedness can cause eyestrain and headaches while reading or working on computers. Glasses or contacts can correct farsightedness and may be prescribed for full or part-time wear. Dr. Schultz utilizes glasses for most part-time wearers and a combination for most full-time wearers. Extreme farsightedness is a common cause of eye turns (strabismus) in infants.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism is most commonly caused by an irregular or “football” shaped cornea or lens. This prevents light from focusing properly on the retina. Although small amounts of astigmatism may go unnoticed, it can cause blurriness in both distance and near vision. Astigmatism may also accompany farsightedness or nearsightedness and can be corrected with glasses and even contact lenses. Dr. Schultz enjoys fitting soft toric contacts that correct astigmatism and can fit a disposable or custom lens type when needed.

Presbyopia

Presbyopia is the age related onset of blurred near vision. Presbyopia happens to everyone! The onset most commonly occurs in our early to mid 40’s and results in eyestrain when reading or doing other close work. Presbyopia occurs whether you are nearsighted, farsighted, astigmatic, or have never worn a correction. Progressive lenses are the most common correction Dr. Schultz recommends. However, monovision, multifocal contacts, and reading glasses are also alternatives. Many people wear a combination of these corrections depending on their occupation and hobbies.

For additional information, visit AllAboutVision.com.